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FILE - In this Dec. 8, 2011, file photo, then-St. Louis Cardinals scouting director Christopher Correa, left, assistant general manager Mike Girsch, center, and general manager John Mozeliak, right, arrive at Lambert-St. Louis International Airport in St. Louis, Mo. Major League Baseball ordered the Cardinals to forfeit their top two picks in this year's amateur draft and pay Houston $2 million as compensation for hacking the Astros email system and scouting database. Baseball Commissioner Rob Manfred banned former St. Louis scouting executive Correa for life on Monday, Jan. 30, 2017, and stripped the Cardinals of the 56th and 75th draft choices in June. (Chris Lee/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP, File)
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  • FILE - In this Dec. 8, 2011, file photo, then-St. Louis Cardinals scouting director Christopher Correa, left, assistant general manager Mike Girsch, center, and general manager John Mozeliak, right, arrive at Lambert-St. Louis International Airport in St. Louis, Mo. Major League Baseball ordered the Cardinals to forfeit their top two picks in this year's amateur draft and pay Houston $2 million as compensation for hacking the Astros email system and scouting database. Baseball Commissioner Rob Manfred banned former St. Louis scouting executive Correa for life on Monday, Jan. 30, 2017, and stripped the Cardinals of the 56th and 75th draft choices in June. (Chris Lee/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP, File)

    Cardinals must give Astros top 2 picks, $2M for hacking

    NEW YORK (AP) — The St. Louis Cardinals were stripped of their top two picks in this year’s amateur draft Monday and ordered to give them to Houston along with $2 million as compensation for hacking the Astros’ email system and scouting database, the final and unprecedented step in an unusual case of cybercrime involving […]
  • FILE - In this Aug. 7, 2014 file photo, the Washington Redskins logo is seen on the field before an NFL football preseason game against the New England Patriots in Landover, Md. The Supreme Court is expressing doubts about a law that bars the government from registering trademarks that are deemed offensive.  (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)

    Justices raise doubts over law barring offensive trademarks

    WASHINGTON (AP) — In a First Amendment clash over a law barring offensive trademarks, the Supreme Court on Wednesday raised doubts about a government program that favors some forms of speech but rejects others that might disparage certain groups. The justices heard arguments in a dispute involving an Asian-American band called the Slants that was […]
  • This Nov. 15, 2016 photo shows a view of the Supreme Court from the Capitol Dome, on Capitol Hill in Washington. An Asian-American rock band called the Slants has spent years locked in a legal battle with the government over its refusal to trademark the band’s name.  The fight will play out Wednesday at the Supreme Court as the justices consider whether a law barring disparaging trademarks violates the band's free speech rights.  (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

    Free speech clash: Justices considering offensive trademarks

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Slants aren’t exactly a household name when it comes to music, but the Asian-American rock band has certainly made its mark in the legal world. The Oregon-based group has spent years locked in a First Amendment battle with the government, which refuses to register a trademark for the band’s name because […]
  • This Nov. 15, 2016 photo shows a view of the Supreme Court from the Capitol Dome, on Capitol Hill in Washington. An Asian-American rock band called the Slants has spent years locked in a legal battle with the government over its refusal to trademark the band’s name.  The fight will play out Wednesday at the Supreme Court as the justices consider whether a law barring disparaging trademarks violates the band's free speech rights.  (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

    Justices to hear free speech clash over offensive trademarks

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Slants aren’t exactly a household name when it comes to music, but the Asian-American rock band has certainly made its mark in the legal world. The Oregon-based group has spent years locked in a First Amendment battle with the government, which refuses to register a trademark for the band’s name because […]