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ESPN’s Paolantonio: No serious discussions between Arizona Cardinals and Minnesota Vikings for Adrian Peterson

LISTEN: Sal Paolantonio- ESPN NFL analyst

Nothing like a little rain on that parade, huh?

For weeks now there have been rumors circulating that the Arizona Cardinals could be on the verge of trading for Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson.

But according to ESPN NFL insider Sal Paolantonio, it might be time to pump the breaks a little bit.

“This is a very fluid situation,” he told Bickley and Marotta on Arizona Sports 98.7 FM Tuesday. “I did talk to Bruce Arians twice so far here, and he said there are no serious discussions of trading for Adrian Peterson. Quote, no serious discussions.”

Paolantonio said he thinks the Cardinals would like to add the dynamic running back, but that the Vikings are not interested in trading away their all-time leading rusher for what he’s hearing teams are said to be offering.

What has to happen, he said, is the Vikings, Peterson and whoever trades for him will have to come up with a compromise.

The Vikings, he said, have to compromise knowing that Peterson will not play for them, because just giving him money will not be enough to pacify him.

“It just doesn’t work like that,” he said. “Human nature takes effect, and Adrian Peterson feels like he’s been disrespected here.”

He pointed to statements made by Peterson as well as his agent Ben Dogra as evidence that the relationship is probably irreparable.

But assuming the Vikings decide they should trade him, someone will have to make the right offer, to both the Vikings and Peterson.

“And the Cardinals, or whoever is going to be the trade partner, they have to increase the amount of money that they are willing to give Adrian Peterson to make him happy, mollify his concerns about his financial future, and make the Vikings whole.”

The third party that would have to compromise, of course, would be Peterson, whom Paolantonio said would have to reduce his monetary expectations or else a deal will not get done.

“Whenever it takes it takes three-sided coin and you’re negotiating like this and you have to have three parties willing to compromise,” he said. “It drags on and on and on, and that’s what you’re seeing here.”