Share this story...
Latest News

Some ideas to help struggling Diamondbacks fans

As the Diamondbacks embark on a road trip it gives us a chance to take stock in what we have.

The team is contending for the NL West crown, there are a few legitimate All-Star candidates, they have a solid foundation of youth and, unfortunately, some struggling fans.

Averaging 22,910 a game through 33 home dates, Chase Field has been about 47 percent full. My problem, though, is not with the amount of fans at the games. The economy means people have to spend their money wisely, and while the D-backs are one of the cheapest tickets in town, the decision to spend money elsewhere is completely understandable.

No, my issue is with fans who show up and, quite frankly, seem lost the second they walk through the doors. Fear not, as my plan isn’t to complain; I want to help. With a full week before the teams’ next game in the Valley of the Sun, there is time to implement a few changes.

Do, whenever possible, show up a couple hours before the game and take in batting practice. Some of my fondest memories as a kid was getting to games early and trying to track down home runs hit during batting practice (I even caught one Matt Williams hit in 1999). Sure, you’ll end up with some time to kill once the players are done, but that can be filled by various activities, such as eating, walking around the ballpark or just relaxing.

Don’t show up in the fourth inning like the fans who asked my buddy and I to move Saturday evening because ‘we were in their seats.’ Yes, we were, but that’s not the point. By that point in the game if you are not in your seat it pretty much becomes fair game. Besides, the section was pretty much empty at first pitch so we grabbed the first seats we saw in the row, making sure everyone else in the section had ample room to stretch out and be comfortable while watching the game. Our bad.


Comments

Comment guidelines: No name-calling, personal attacks, profanity, or insults. Please keep the conversation civil and help us moderate comments by reporting abuse.
comments powered by Disqus