If MLK Jr. Had Lived

Joe Warren, 86, poses at his home in Memphis, Tenn. Thursday, March 20, 2008. Warren was a sanitation worker in Memphis in 1968 when fellow sanitation workers met at his house to discuss a possible strike. The strike brought Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. to Memphis for a march and ultimately led to King's assassination on April 4, 1968. (AP Photo/Greg Campbell) The sun shines on the balcony of the Lorraine Hotel in Memphis, Tenn. Tuesday, March 25, 2008, the site where Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated on April 4, 1968. The hotel is now part of the National Civil Rights Museum. (AP Photo/Greg Campbell) The National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, Tenn. depicts the 1968 sanitation workers' strike with a display, Tuesday, March 25, 2008. The museum is at the site of the Lorraine Hotel where Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated on April 4, 1968. (AP Photo/Greg Campbell)  This April 1968 photo released by the MLK Jr. National Historic Site, Martin Luther King Jr.s' body is carried to Morehouse College in Atlanta, on a mule-drawn wagon accompanied by his aides dressed in denim attire. The wagon, mules and denim clothes symbolized the Poor People's Campaign. The photograph is part of the exhibition "From Memphis to Atlanta: The Drum Major Returns Home" at Atlanta's Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historic Site April 4-August 31, 2008. (AP Photo/MLK Jr. National Historic Site,Courtesy of Bob Adelman)
Members of the Congressional Black Caucus, from left, Rep. John Conyers, D-Mich., Rep. Al Green, D-Texas, Rep. Laura Richardson, R-Calif., Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, D-Texas, and Rep. G.K. Butterfield, D-N.C. attend a ceremony in Statuary Hall on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, April 3, 2008, to honor Martin Luther King Jr. House and Senate leaders held a ceremony to honor the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. the day before the 40th anniversary of his death. (AP Photo/Lauren Victoria Burke) In this undated photo released by the MLK Jr. National Historic Site, this two mule team wagon used to carry the body of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. during his funeral procession on April 9, 1968 serves as the centerpiece of the exhibition "From Memphis to Atlanta: The Drum Major Returns Home" at Atlanta's Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historic Site April 4-August 31, 2008. (AP Photo/Courtsey of MLK Jr. National Historic Site) From left, Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., and Rep. Carolyn Kilpatrick, D-Mich., join hands and sing We Shall Overcome on Thursday, April 3, 2008 on Capitol Hill in Washington. House and Senate leaders held a ceremony to honor the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. the day before the 40th anniversary of his death. (AP Photo/Lauren Victoria Burke)
Pastor Raphael G. Warnock, of the Ebenezer Baptist Church sits in front of a portrait of Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., during an interview in his office at the historic church in downtown Atlanta, Thursday, Sept. 14, 2006. Four decades after the assassination of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., black pastors who follow King's example and defy war, racism and poverty are still considered a minority within a minority. (AP Photo/Ric Feld)
 Rev. Timothy McDonald III, senior pastor of the First Iconium Baptist Church, Atlanta, Ga., addresses a rally outside the Supreme Court in Washington in this Wednesday, Feb. 20, 2002 file photo. Four decades after the assassination of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., black pastors who follow King's example and defy war, racism and poverty are still considered a minority within a minority. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)  In this photo provided by The Rosen Group, Journalist Juan Williams holds his book "My Soul Looks Back in Wonder," a collection of eyewitness accounts from people who played active roles in the civil rights movement, at the book launch party in this May 26, 2004 file photo in New York. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated on April 4, 1968 in Memphis. (AP Photo/The Rosen Group, Stuart Ramson, file)  Martin Luther King III, son of civil-rights leader Martin Luther King Jr., speaks during an interview in Atlanta, in this Dec. 8, 2006 file photo. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated on April 4, 1968 in Memphis. (AP Photo/John Bazemore, file)
Martin Luther King III, left, his wife Arndrea, and his sister, Rev. Bernice King, pray at the tomb of their father, civil-rights leader the Rev. Martin Luther Jr., Friday, April 4, 2008, in Atlanta on the 40th anniversary of King's assassination. (AP Photo/John Bazemore) Democratic presidential hopeful, Sen. Barack Obama D-Ill., speaks about the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., at a town hall meeting at Wayne High School in Fort Wayne, Ind., Friday, April 4, 2008. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
 Martin Luther King Jr., second right, and SCLC aides Hosea Williams, Jesse Jackson Jr., from left, and Ralph Abernathy return to the Lorraine Motel in Memphis to strategize for the second Sanitation Worker's march led by King in this April 3, 1968 file photo. King was shot dead on the balcony April 4, 1968. The photograph is part of the exhibition "From Memphis to Atlanta: The Drum Major Returns Home" at Atlanta's Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historic Site April 4-August 31, 2008. (AP Photo/File)
 The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., is seen in this undated file photo. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated on April 4, 1968 in Memphis. (AP Photo/file)